18 Books to Watch for in 2018

2018

While 2017 is a year many of us will gladly wave goodbye to, it was a great year for reading! It was full of debut books and series, and boasted many diverse titles. Readers were introduced to a dynamic range of characters and issues while being continually encouraged to explore new topics and places between the pages. For readers everywhere, it has been rewarding and encouraging. 2018 promises to take that trend and expand on it. Here are 18 books that I cannot wait to add to my shelves over the next few months.

January

1/2/18

the cruel prince.jpg
Already making impressive rounds among some of my favorite reviewers, I would be a terrible liar if I did not include Holly Black’s The Cruel Prince on the list. It follows Jude, a human struggling to discover her place among the fey and earn a spot at Court. It promises politics, fantasy and a solid start to a new series.

 

1/9/18

thunderhead

 

Neal Shusterman returns with the anticipated sequel to Scythe, Thunderhead (Arc of a Scythe #2). This one has been on my calendar since I recently reviewed the first in this satisfying and witty dystopian series.

 

nice try

 

Lianne Oelke’s  Nice Try, Jane Sinner follows 17-year-old Jane as she takes up residence in a local reality show and attempts to find her own way in this world through some more unconventional means.

 

robotsvsfairies

 

Robots VS. Fairies is exactly what it claims to be; an anthology that brings the two together in battle. But who will prevail? A collision of science fiction and fantasy, it promises to deliver fun and pit two beloved genres against one another.

 

the immortalists.jpg

Chloe Benjamin’s The Immortalists tackles an age-old question: What would happen if you knew the day you would die? Set in 1969, it answers just that through the lives of 4, young and now enlightened individuals and the path they each take.

 

 

1/16/18

oliver loving

 

Oliver Loving by Stefan Merrill Block offers an in-depth look at the effects of tragedy on family and community. Following a school shooting, Oliver is left paralyzed and speechless. With his fate unknown and answers left hanging, it is a unique observance of grief, loss, and love through those surrounding him.

 

everything here
A family drama centered around the bond between two sisters, Everything Here is Beautiful by Mira T. Lee provides alternating perspectives into the lives of two women. One sister who begins to experience symptoms of mental disturbance after the death of their mother, and the other who will fight to save her.

 

red clocks
Red Clocks , a novel by Leni Zumas looks to be a solid approach to feminist dystopian fiction, and I am very excited for this one! Observing the lives of 5 women in a small, Oregon town, it tackles the relevant and ever scary topic of women’s rights and the loss of freedom.

 

1/23/18

eternal life.jpg

 

Dara Horn’s Eternal Life tells the story of Rachel, a woman who cannot die. Exploring the effects of her immortality on herself and those she loves, it offers a glimpse into the many facets of life and the purpose behind death. This promises to be a delightful, yet moving read.

 

1/30/18

the hazel wood
The Hazel Wood is a debut, YA fantasy by Melissa Albert following 17 year-old Alice. Her mother is suddenly stolen away after the death of her reclusive grandmother, who it just so happens authored a cult classic book of dark fairy tales. The real kicker here is that the kidnapper claims to be from the Hinterland, the setting of her grandmother’s infamous stories.

 

February

2/6/18

an american marriage.jpg
Tayari Jones provides us with a look at the devastating effects that a wrongful conviction has on the marriage of two newly weds living the American Dream. Celestial and Roy find their lives torn apart when Roy is sentenced to 12 years in prison for a crime he did not commit in An American Marriage.

 

heart berries
Given a notebook, Terese Mailhot begins to write her way out of trauma in the memoir Heart Berries. It follows her dysfunctional upbringing and life on Seabird Island Indian Reservation in the Pacific Northwest, which included hospitalization and a dual diagnosis of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Bipolar II.

 

2/13/18

freshwater.jpg
Akwaeke Emezi’s novel Freshwater follows Ada, a young Nigerian woman, who suffers a troubled childhood and several selves. After moving away to an American college, a traumatic assault leads her into a dangerous spiral as her different selves begin to gain control.

 

March

3/6/18

children of blood and bone.jpg
Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi promises to be an incredible start to something big. Maji have been targeted and killed under the reign of a ruthless king. Now Zélie fights to bring magic back and put an end to the terrorizing monarchy. At nearly 600 pages, this looks to leave a big mark in YA fantasy!

 

the wicked deep
Shea Ernshaw’s The Wicked Deep admittedly sounds very familiar when first reading through the synopsis (I am thinking Hocus Pocus), but the promise of a cursed town and 3 vengeful spirits has captured my interest. With a protagonist forced to choose between her own life and that of another, it looks to be a fantastic paranormal addition to the lineup.

 

3/13/18

the merry spinster

 

The Merry Spinster: Tales of Everyday Horror by Mallory Ortberg offers a collection of stories based upon classic fairy tales. It boast a dark and mischievous twist that is sure to capture the interest of fantasy and horror fans alike. I am hopeful that this will be a nice introduction to Ortberg’s writing.

 

the parking lot

 

Nafkote Tamirat’s The Parking Lot Attendant is a coming-of-age story about a young girl who falls for a hustler in Boston’s Ethiopian community. It offers a glimpse into life as an immigrant and explores self-identity in today’s America.

 

 

the red word

 

The Red Word by Sarah Henstra promises to be a challenging and worthy read. It takes a brazen look at college life, politics on campus and rape culture.

 

 


What titles are you most anticipating this year? Will you be adding any of the above to your list?

Happy Reading!

Danielle ❤

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65 thoughts on “18 Books to Watch for in 2018

  1. Ahhhh thank you for this list! Since I’ve been on hiatus, I am sooooo out of the new release loop its not even funny. I’ve seen maybe two of these covers before ((hides head in shame)) but I definitely added The Cruel Prince to my TBR and will be keeping my eyes peeled for reviews for The Hazel Wood & The Immortalists.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Happy new year!

    I’m looking forward to Disappearance of Winter’s Daughter and Bloody Rose. I don’t really keep up with new releases, though. Just browse when at the store 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes, Disappearance is fourth in a Michael Sullivan series. I really like his books.
        There are a few thrillers you reviewed that I want to see if my library has.

        Liked by 1 person

          1. I would start with his first series (especially since it’s complete! 🙂 ) Theft of Swords Omnibus and The Crown Conspiracy is the first book (I’m not sure if the e/books is still available or you have to go with the omnibus).

            Liked by 1 person

  3. I confess I haven’t been looking much into 2018 releases yet, so this post is a little goldmine! These sound fantastic.

    I’m particularly looking forward to Bright We Burn (Conquerors Saga book 3) by Kiersten White, The Great Alone by Kristin Hannah, Every Note Played by Lisa Genova, Wolfhunter River (Stillhouse Lake book 3) by Rachel Caine & Hero At The Fall (Rebel Of The Sands book 3) by Alwyn Hamilton… Although I know there are tons of titles missing on this list. xD

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Well I am excited to see your own thoughts on Hazelwoid when you start it. I wish now that I had requested it.. but ah, hindsight. I am sure that it is a title I will eventually pick up regardless of reviews. I am stubborn haha. Particularly when it comes to books with a fairy tale element 😉

      Liked by 1 person

          1. A Time of Dread can be read as a stand-alone but it set in the same universe as his 4 book series that he completed. If you want to to start with those four books, then Malice (by John Gwynne) would be the starting point! Otherwise, if you don’t mind getting that “lore” backstory from that series, then you can probably read A Time of Dread without too many issues. 😉

            Liked by 1 person

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