Tagging Authors in Blog Post Titles: I Have Questions (Asking for a Friend)

*Please remember as always this is simply for discussion only. I do not feel there is a right or wrong. I just love picking your blogging minds โค

Lately, it has resurfaced on Twitter and social media, that little PSA: Please Do Not Tag Authors in Negative Reviews. I have never personally tagged an author in a negative review (I cannot understand why someone would unless they had a personal grudge to fulfill or it was a complete doh moment?), but I have had a few instances where fellow bloggers chose to share my less than stellar thoughts and tag the author *cringe* *facepalm*. The results were mortifying. I wanted to reach out and apologize to the author, not for my review but the blogger’s decision to tag them but had no idea what the proper etiquette in this scenario was.

I am sorry that I do not like your book and someone decided to share my horrible review with you. I still do not like the book, but hey.. hugs!

Awkward! Why would someone even opt to tag the author for me? The entire experience left me with multiple questions I had no answers to.

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Naturally, recent conversations led me to think further about this topic and opened up new questions. Now, I know that many of you choose to include hashtags in your blog post titles so that these are properly shared on social media (i.e. Twitter) and I get this. While I choose not to do this, I understand the concept. However, I am also seeing that a lot of bloggers are including author Twitter handles in the these as well.. so naturally..

I Have Questions!

Do you choose to also include the author’s Twitter handle directly in your post title?

If so, do you make sure to only do this for reviews of a certain rating or higher?

Is this something that was requested by the ARC/Review Copy supplier?

Do you only do this with promotional/tour posts?

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Ideally, when I see these headers, I imagine the author is receiving a notification for every single share on that specific post. Maybe this amounts to a small handful, or maybe you have a great day and this really adds up ๐Ÿ‘ Think mountains baby!

I cannot lie, I am tempted to remove author tags before sharing. I don’t because I know that many bloggers feel it’s incredibly rude to alter the hashtags and handles they have in place for sharing purposes and I respect that.

But why would you want to do that you ask? Glad you did!
Maybe it is just me, but receiving a notice every single time a post written by a blogger about a book is shared combined with other reviewers also tagging that author feels like it could add up to incredible amounts. I am guessing they only need to see the review once at best. *Think that time you were tagged with 10 other people in a tweet and the conversation spiraled out of control until you finally remembered you could mute it! Let me also take this moment to apologize for the entire time period before I learned how to reply back to only one specific person in said threads ๐Ÿ˜‰

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But perhaps this is a promotional post (i.e. tour, blitz) and these tags and notifications help authors and publishers gain a sense of reach? Maybe they prefer this and benefit from it?

I do not include hashtags and Twitter handles in my own blog posts titles. I tend to do this as a separate, manual tweet. It is a personal preference, not a matter of me saying one way is right or wrong.

So I am asking you: What are your preferences on this? Do you find that it is better to include author tags directly in the post title? Maybe you feel the notifications do not matter in the long run of things and that it is more beneficial to have the tweets shared in every possible way each time. If you are an author, would you want to be tagged in this specific manner? Asking for a friend ๐Ÿ˜‰

Let’s Chat,

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119 thoughts on “Tagging Authors in Blog Post Titles: I Have Questions (Asking for a Friend)

  1. As much as possible I hate posting negative reviews especially when I received an arc of their book. But it can’t be helped.

    I don’t tag them on my post nor directly on blog post title same as you. If I loved and enjoyed their book on the other hand I tweet my post tagging them saying how much others would love it too.

    If I came across a book I didn’t like in a conversation, I just steer clear from it but when a conversation must go on about it I explain aspects of which I find it not for me etc. I really try not to offend author and such as much as I can but when I call out is needed I have to unleash piece about it.

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    1. Seems we have similar approaches. I do not mind discussing my problems/issues with a book but will never direct them at the author. Although I have had an author email me requesting this feedback. I supplied it, but it was awkward to do. I just cannot help but feel like some of the tagging gets out of hand lately haha. But I am sure that is just my opinion ๐Ÿ˜‰

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  2. I only write reviews that I rate at 3 stars and above. If I canโ€™t rate a book to that minimum then I donโ€™t spend the time writing a review. I like to think of my site as one that recommends books that I like. If I see a review that is negative I donโ€™t share, but I may like the blog post instead of I feel the review has been written fairly xx

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    1. I will share reviews that are lower rating if I feel they ate insightful and have a lot to offer readers. I think sometimes it can be very valuable to discuss problematic books and also just highlight potential issues. But I would never, ever tag an author in them for sure. I like your approach very much though!

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  3. I don’t know most authors’ handles. So I can’t tag them.
    Secondly with Amazon being so watchful, I think it is better not to tag, apparently tagging shows knowing the author, so reviews may be removed.
    Thirdly I would probably tag the author only in a blog tour as that would let them know about the post.
    I would prefer not tagging anyone. If someone tags the authors on a retweet, then that’s not in my hands.
    Fourthly, I am new to this tagging business, so I keep forgetting to tag friends too even in a friendly tweet.

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    1. I have never had any of the problems everyone seems to encounter with Amazon and have been reviewing with them for years. I guess I have managed to keep within the guidelines. But I also suppose that if they ever got to the point that they were monitoring Twitter accounts (which I do not have connected to them) I would ditch them, because that is a who new level of discussion Haha. I don’t think they would though. I will share with authors and publishers when I have been in communication with with them or it is a rave review, but only once as a single tweet. I have made some incredible contacts through this ๐Ÿ’• but in general, tagging is limited on my part as well so I get it.

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      1. They have begun checking Facebook, they monitor IP addresses, so Twitter is not far away. I don’t want to prod a sleeping tiger. So I don’t tag. Besides all my reviews are on Amazon and the author gets to see them from their central station or their page. Amazon send them some kind of information about reviews

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  4. I tend to tag the author in a manual tweet if I’ve really liked the book and I want them to see my review! And if I remember of course! I hadn’t thought to tag in blog post titles though and am not sure I would now I know either. I do like when authors find and retweet my tweets even when I haven’t tagged them – have started lots of fun chats that way!

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    1. Agree! I am not personally for including them in blog post titles so that the tags occur with every single share. But I do share my good reviews with pubs and authors manually, just once haha. And like you have had great conversations and made some worthwhile contacts ๐Ÿ’•

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    1. There’s actually a policy on Goodreads that prevents authors from commenting on or liking every review of their own books because readers start to feel like someone is watching them or invading their territory. You’re right: reviews ARE for readers. Otherwise, we’re saying that reviews are meant to make an author feel a certain way (fluffed up or terrible), and that’s not the point.

      I used to put authors’ Twitter handles in my titles but have since stopped because I actually saw authors writing Tweets asking reviewers to stop doing it. Before, I hadn’t even thought of it. I thought adding Twitter handles was just good promotion.

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      1. Thank you for adding this to the conversation! I was not aware of this policy at all but it makes so much sense. I only include tags in specific tweets if it is an ARC of promotion and I have been asked to. But reviews are definitely for readers and most authors I encounter actually choose to avoid them for personal reasons ๐Ÿ˜Š I think most would also prefer to look them up and read them on their own terms if they choose to do so. Great point!

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  5. Interesting post Danielle. Itโ€™s something iโ€™ve wondered about.
    I wouldnโ€™t add an author tag to anyone elseโ€™s post. That would be going against the wishes of the blog post owner.

    Most authors seem to appreciate being tagged iโ€™ve found personally but I only review books Iโ€™ve enjoyed on my blog. Itโ€™s all a matter of personal choice. Thatโ€™s just the way I prefer it. I feel that I donโ€™t want to waste any time reviewing a book I hadnโ€™t enjoyed. Would rather move on and read something else.
    Each to their own though.
    I have wondered about tagging really hugely popular authors and if they might be fed up with so many notifications since their feeds and notifications are probably full of adoring fans. So I may not do that any more

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    1. Yes exactly. My big question is that I see so many bloggers now choosing to put these tags directly in the blog post titles. Which means authors are receiving multiple tags for every shares. I could be way wrong, but it feels like it would become such a nuisance for the author after a bit? I have no qualms with tagging an author in a good review at times though. I have made some good connections this way ๐Ÿ˜‰ and I tag publishers when they are waiting for a review.

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  6. I only email authors who give me review copies once itโ€™s up. Fortunately, they have never been truly negative so far since I accept what interests me. Otherwise, I wouldnโ€™t tag authors. If I bought the book, I wouldnโ€™t tag them. Regardless of whether I bought it or got if for review, reviews are for readers. If an author gets a negative review, either donโ€™t read and react or accept the constructive criticism to get better.

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    1. Thank you Alexia and you are so correct! I have always believed reviews are for readers! Although, I have no problem with sharing a race one with them and will tag publishers when I know that they are waiting on my review, but otherwise, I am not much of a tagger. I am just curious about bloggers including these tags in their posts titles so that every single share tags the author and publisher. It seems like it would be overwhelming at some point ๐Ÿ˜Š

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    1. Hashtags I totally get! They spread the word and snag views. The only reason I do not put them in my titles in because aesthetically, my brain cannot handle the appearance ๐Ÿ˜‚ But I will add them manually and I will tweet an author or publisher if I know they are waiting on the review. I am more wondering about the inclusion of the author tags directly in post titles so that every single share pings them. It seems like they must get flooded with Twitter notices!?

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  7. I tag authors, the publisher and the publicist in blog tours. After all, the whole idea of tour is to promote the author and their work.

    If I have an author guest on my blog then I tag them in the blog post.

    If I’m reviewing a book I’ll tag the author and publisher in the initial tweet and then then again either later in the same day or following day incase they missed it and/or so they can share it again.

    I have tagged authors in blog post titles but it’s only when I’ve seen others do it previously and have seen that the author doesn’t mind but if I haven’t seen it before then I don’t as I don’t want to offend.

    Ha, I have no idea why anyone would tag an author in a negative review, it’s crazy! Well, I guess I have an idea, it’s attention seeking, but damn, stupid and crazy and serves no purpose.๐Ÿ™„

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    1. Working from phone at them minute so forgive typos haha ๐Ÿ˜‚ So I totally get the hashtags. I know they spread the word and snag views. I would do better to include them but my brain is hung up on how the look so I choose to do it in separate tweets. I am obsessive like that lol. I also can appreciate tweeting an author and publisher in a single tweet. I do this with review copies for certain ones as I know they like to share and are waiting on links. I guess my real question is how do we actually know when we put these directly in the blog post titles that the author is okay with receiving all of these notifications for every single share? We see it done, but it seems like a lot to me? Maybe they enjoy seeing their feed blow up with their work though? ๐Ÿ˜‰ I guess it could be flattering, but I also imagine if you are a well know writer it could also be adding to a rather large pile maybe. Dunno.. just the thoughts that kick around my little head haha. And yeah no clue why people still tag authors in bad reviews, but they do. It seems mean and pointless. I think you are on point about that one ๐Ÿ˜‰

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      1. Yeah, that’s valid, totally get that. I guess we have to rely on the author saying if they don’t like being added to blog posts but I haven’t seen that and most seem to like it and interact with the tweets, liking and retweeting them, etc.

        It is a hard one though and each author is different, one may like it, another won’t and unless the specific author tells you either way you don’t know.

        For blog tours you are supposed to add the publisher and author handle in the title, it’s supposedly one of the rules (it was even mentioned today in a FB group) and I get that. Same for having an author on your blog, that’s personal choice down to the blogger, I do include them in the title as they wanted to appear on the blog, they can promote themselves and some need reminding over that.๐Ÿ˜‚ I guess the way around that is to ask them if they want to be included in the blog post title so that they get notifications or not when conversing with them over the post.

        It’s definitely mean but I think partly I am right too and that is sad that they do it for attention seeking. I actually saw something in a FB group the other week where someone had tagged the author in a negative review and the author was in the wrong (according to the person) for not thanking them for their negative review!๐Ÿ™„

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        1. See that is so weird to me. I have never had a single tour host request this and it has never once been an issue. It is more of a UK thing? You have facebook groups for tours? I usually just get an email from the publisher asking if I want to partake in the tour and what kind of content I want to provide. Then I email them a link when it goes live. No extra requirements really outside of maybe a tweet to them to share on social media.

          I am learning all kinds of things ๐Ÿ˜‚

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          1. No, well, yeah, there’s a couple of groups for tours. They are for those on the organisers list so if you don’t get an email for a tour or a graphic, etc you can use the group. I’m in one but haven’t done a tour yet for the organiser. I’m not even sure what I read was in the tour group, it might well have just been in a book blogger group but yeah, I’ve not had it actually requested just generally seen that it happens but then bam, I read it is expected, host, publisher and author. Actually I think it was the tour group come to think of it as I saw a thread saying that there has been a lot of blogs sign up for the tours recently and they were listing requirements and tagging was a requirement. As I said, it might not have been though and it could have been a thread in a general group.

            Honestly, I phase out at times, at least I phased out on this as they mentioned review length too and that reviews should be a decent length or it is disappointing for the author, publisher and looks bad on the organiser but neglected to actually say what they think a suitable length is.๐Ÿ™„

            I doubt it is a UK thing and more of a whoever is organising it thing.

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  8. I certainly have no issues with writing negative reviews, or even super duper negative reviews. I don’t use twitter though, or hash tags. I also want authors to leave me alone so I leave them alone, in the way you’re talking about. Any author ever finds a review of their book and comments on my blog, that will be because they searched it out, not because I shoved it in their face.

    I like a nice thick wall between authors and me. They’re not people who might be my best buds that I can just pal around with. If they’re not in a room writing, then they’ve failed the Bookstooge Author Test ๐Ÿ˜‰

    If authors want to accept the good hashtags, then they better damn well accept the bad ones as well. I don’t think either are appropriate but if someone is going to use one, then they better have the backbone, and the honesty, to use it all the time.

    Now, someone ELSE adding an author to YOUR tweet. That is so beyond acceptable. That type of thing is EXACTLY why I won’t use twitter. Nobody else should change someone else’s content. They should write their own.

    Obviously, this is an issue I feel strongly about, from authors to content control :-D.

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    1. Haha I can always count on you for a solid and agreeable opinion! I firmly believe that reviews are for readers and not authors. I do occasionally tag a publisher and author if I know they expect it (a few I work with like to share on social media) but only if it is a decent review. I have had not so good reviews shared where the blogger chose to tag the author and was pretty irate if being honest. It was uncalled for and rude towards the author and me. I think you are very wise for skipping the whole social media scene. I should have taken a page or two from your book I think ๐Ÿ˜‚

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      1. Yeah, I’ve turned off most of the social buttons here on WP so people can’t easily share my stuff. I really, really, really don’t like the whole re-post thing.

        And it just wears me out. I used to crosspost to tumblr, but it was pointless as I wasn’t using tumblr and as such, wasn’t trying to interact with other people there. I got to the point where I just threw up my hands and said “no more”.

        And yeah, reviews are for other readers. The author is the last person I’m thinking of ๐Ÿ˜€

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  9. I probably can’t help much here because for the most part, I don’t tag. I’ve started to use #Netgalley or #book title, but that’s it and only when reading ARC’s. For someone to tag an author in a negative review seems wrong, but everyone has their own opinions and thoughts on what’s acceptable. With social media it seems to be anything goes. I’ll be honest and say I hate writing negative reviews and probably wouldn’t ever want them promoted for attention either. Luckily it doesn’t happen often. ๐Ÿงก

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    1. I agree with you to each their own, although no one should choose to tag an author in someone else’s negative review. I feel like that crosses a line. I have seen that Netgalley is encouraging the use of hashtags and I never remember to do it ๐Ÿ˜‚ I am not good about tags and Twitter handles. Still learning a lot I guess. But I do tag publishers and authors in reviews when I know they expect it. Certain ones like to share on social media it seems. You are definitely right though, it seems anything goes! ๐Ÿ’•

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  10. Iโ€™ve never tagged an author in any review, and I delete all the @s before I share somebody elseโ€™s review on social media. Reviews are for readers, not authors. Iโ€™ve had a few authors find my reviews and share them on their social media, and it always freaks me out. I try to be nice in all my reviews, but I donโ€™t write them for the author, so I don’t tag the author.

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    1. On that we agree AJ! Reviews are for readers not the authors. I tend to tag the publishers and authors that I know expect/like it with my ARCs, but that is about it. Although I kind of fail with Twitter being honest. And tend to be cautious with social media in general. Once it is out there, there is no getting it back ๐Ÿ˜‚

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  11. I never tagged and I’ll never tag an author on a negative review. And I can’t understand why someone needs to do this. Sometimes, when I truly love a book I tag the author in a tweet with a link to my review,or maybe I just tweet a comment about the book(and I’m really sad everytime I’m being ignored) but I never tag an author in the post title. I’m a shy person, so I’m always afraid to disturb another person.

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    1. I agree! And see nothing wrong with sharing a rave review with them. I have made some surprising connections this way โค but yes I would never include them in a negative review or the post title. I am not trying to flood someone’s notifications. It seems like too much to me, but maybe some authors request this on tours? I would probably decline the tour at that point though as I am funny and cannot nadle the thought of cluttering up my post titles with tags.

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  12. Speaking as an author, It always kinda rubbed me wrong when other authors would say ‘don’t link me in your negative reviews’

    I mean, when it comes down to it, it’s common courtesy that most bloggers seem to agree with, not to tag an author if you’re posting a negative review. But I also think that authors don’t have the privilege to demand such a thing. Politely request, maybe, but definitely not demand or, for that matter, expect.

    I think that once you put your work out there for the world to see, you’re opening yourself up for criticism, and if you can’t take that, than being an author is not the career for you. I personally welcome reviews of all types. I actually like reviews with constructive criticisms, hell I even like the ones that aren’t so constructive, because after I get over the sting, I know that that’s free advice that I can either take, or not take.

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    1. Ah thanks so much for commenting here and giving some actual insight to this! I love your take on it and wish many others felt this way. I personally have always felt that my reviews are for readers anyways and that as you say, once your work is out there, you kind of have to be prepared to take what comes with that. It does still get at me though when another blogger makes a point of tagging an author in my negative review though. I feel that they are out there and authors can choose to utilize them or not, but no one should make the choice to purposely draw that author’s attention to my review for me. Sorry, I am rambling a bit I think. I cannot think you enough for shedding some perspective on this!

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  13. I got into the habit of tagging both the author and the publisher within my blog post title after seeing others do it. Then I decided to only tag the publisher, but I’m probably going to stop doing that, as well. I’m starting to dislike seeing those Twitter handles in my post titles. Not to mention, the publisher has access to my reviews via Netgalley or Edelweiss, so what’s the point of tagging them within my titles? They’re going to see it sooner or later, anyway.

    Great discussion post!

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    1. Thanks Betty! I am funny about aesthetics, so speaking in terms of strictly appearances, I was never able to bring myself to include Twitter Handles or hashtags in titles. I have also always worried that setting a post up so that it pings someone every single time it is shared is overkill and not going to be welcomed by all. But that could be me overthinking it? I do tag certain pubs and authors in a single, manual tweet because I know from working with them that they like this, but generally I let Netgalley and Edelweiss do the work as you mentioned or if it is a physical copy, email the link ๐Ÿ’•

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  14. I don’t include anything in my post title, apart from the actual post title.
    I find all the # and @ things in post titles super messy. Some people add so many that i have a hard time even understanding what the title is.

    I add the #s and @s in the little box of the post editor, that it basically going to be the text of the tweet. However if someone tweets my post from the main page, these won’t appear.

    I used the author tag for blog tours, because the tour organiser asked. Or if it’s a netgalley book and it’s in the suggestion or something.

    Otherwise i don’t use it.

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    1. Yes! Thank you ๐Ÿ’• I admit it drives me bonkers seeing them too. But I felt so bad saying it because everyone seems to be using them in titles now haha. I usually just do a manual tweet with the tags if I need to tag someone for whatever reason. I kind of always want to remove all of that when sharing other posts, but then I have seen bloggers get upset and claim it is rude to do so! But what if I want to share your review but not tag a ton of people lol?

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  15. Thank you SO MUCH for putting together this post, Danielle! It has been really interesting to read the comments and see the various opinions that everyone has on this topic!

    As a newer blogger, I will admit to still finding my way around things. Back when I first started I did tag Tomi Adeyemi on twitter when I shared my review of Children of Blood and Bone – my thought process at the time was I wanted to connect readers to her twitter more than anything and celebrate such an amazing read. I never really thought about what it would be like to be tagged in TONS of review posts and reactions, especially Tomi given that the book was the buzz of the blogging world and massively hyped,I was just so excited! And I think that may be a lot of it.

    Since then and as I have come into my own a bit as a book blogger, I have leaned away from tagging authors for the most part. There is one Indie author (Lindsay Buroker) that I have fun interactions with, but other than that if anything I just tag the publisher. I wouldn’t ever tag an author in a negative review; while I am careful to make sure my negative reviews are constructive, I don’t think it is nice or appropriate and I prescribe to the sentiment that reviews are for readers.

    I am on a couple blog tours and I have been asked to share with specific hashtags and tags, but I prefer to edit them in manually instead of the post title for personal aesthetic reasons.

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    1. Exactly! You and I are on the same wavelength here (shocker right?) ๐Ÿ˜‰ I think the occasional tag is definitely okay though. But I feel like an author or publisher never needs to see the post more than once unless specifically requesting something different. So like you, it will always be a single manual tweet if I have a reason for sharing with them. I tend to favor pubs over authors also.

      I struggle lately with sharing other people’s posts anymore. I want to, but I do not want to tag everyone when I am doing so. But it has been mentioned more than once that it is “rude” to remove those tags. So to be honest, I am cutting back on sharing such posts. Which is sad, but the reality.

      Thanks love ๐Ÿ’•

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  16. I don’t really use hashtags on social media. I got tagged in a Twitter post that led to over 50 notifications a day for over a week and it was a bit of a nightmare trying to look at each one. In the end I gave up. I’m a small blog and I’m hardly on Twitter so I keep things simple. Sometimes with an Indie author I’ll incluse their Twitter ID in my tweet if the review is a good one to assist them if they want to use it for marketing or just so they can see that someone enjoyed the book. But never for a negative one! I feel that would be rubbing the author’s nose in it!

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    1. Yes! Those out of control notifications are a prime example of what I am talking about. Everytime I see someone setting the post title up to include the author’s Twitter Handle, I just picture the fact that they are getting a notice for every single tweet of that post. It seems excessive and I would imagine possibly frustrating if you have a larger or busy account. I prefer to include anything like that in a single separate tweet as well. But as someone else mentioned, seems anything goes with social media anymore.

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  17. I do use the author’s Twitter handle in my post title. Almost all of my reviews are blog tour ones at the moment and that seems to be the thing to do. But I have wondered if I should still do it when it’s not a blog tour review. Hmmm….. And I never do it if I wasn’t too keen on the book, even though I always say something nice about the book.

    I’d love to know what authors think about this and whether they are sick of receiving notification after notification or whether they like/want it that way.

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  18. I don’t include author tags in my review posts either, Danielle. I sometimes tag them on Facebook or twitter but only if it is a good review that I think they will want to share.

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  19. I donโ€™t tag authors in my reviews because reviews are for readers not authors, Unless the author/publishers/publicist has asked that I do. I can imagine once theyโ€™ve read the review once all the other notifications for that review become annoying, and Iโ€™m sure theyโ€™ll thank everyone because they donโ€™t want to appear as rude (like great review for my book, thanks, but donโ€™t tag me next time – I canโ€™t imagine thatโ€™d go down well ๐Ÿ˜‚).

    Iโ€™m going to be honest, I do occasionally remove twitter handles if 4, 5 people have been tagged, thatโ€™s too much imo, and just looks messy with a handful of tags and hashtags ๐Ÿ™ˆ Each to their own though ๐Ÿคท๐Ÿพโ€โ™€๏ธ

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    1. Omg Janel I love you haha! So badly I want to remove all of that when sharing but have been told it is “very rude” as the blogger included it for a reason. But if I am taking the time to share someone’s post, I do feel it should be up to me whether I tag people or not ๐Ÿ˜‚ You are now my hero for multiple reasons ๐Ÿ™Š I feel the same though. Who really wants a notification every single time the same post is shared?! If you’ve seen it once, you’ve seen it twice ๐Ÿ˜‰

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      1. It canโ€™t be โ€œvery rudeโ€ – would they rather you removed tags and share or not share at all? Also, if they want to measure there โ€œreachโ€ to inform publishers, give them a copy of your stats for that post, makes more sense, unless, of course theyโ€™ve asked to be tagged, and I know a few do. People are so sensitive these days ๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿคฃ

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  20. Interesting topic Danielle. I guess people do it so that they can be more assured that the author will see and read their review. Some authors would have found their review anyway, but I’m sure some authors (those who are more well known perhaps?) are not as concerned with the opinions of lowly bookbloggers. I think I’ve done it a few times – but only when I LOVED their book and I wanted them to know how much I loved it.
    I’d be interested in hearing some authors weigh in on this issue.

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    1. I think tagging an author is okay, I really do. My question is about including it in a blog post title so that the author receives a tag/notice for every time the post is shared. This seems like it could become really overwhelming, particularly if the post does well and attracts a lot of attention hehe. But I could be wrong, I am sure some authors enjoy it ๐Ÿ™‚

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  21. I have also had other people tweet my reviews and tag the authors, when this is not something I would have done myself. They were three star reviews, so not “bad,” but they were far from 100% upbeat and positive, and I also thought it was awkward and hoped the author would not actually look at the review. :/

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I have no issue with tagging authors on five star reviews, but I don’t do it. I think many authors don’t read reviews because they don’t know what they’ll see if they do. If I want to tell an author I think their book is awesome, I think the best way is to just tell them that! By tweet, email, or whatever. This seems more straightforward than sending them a link and, honestly, I think sending a link can come across as “Please share my positive review with readers so I get views” and less as “I really like your book.” Whether that’s the intention or not.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes! I tend to only tag authors and publishers in ARCs and such where it has been asked of me. And I only send email links for the same. But I do not think it is wrong for a blogger to tag them in their enthusiasm. I just worry everytime I want to share a post and see a million hashtags and Twitter handles pop up automatically. I am tempted to removed them or not share. I am like, “Oh man. How many times has this poor publisher or author been tagged about this post?” ๐Ÿ˜‚

        Like

        1. Same. I’ll tag in review copies and sometimes if the review is really 100% positive. I’m probably overthinking it, but I feel bad even if the review is mostly positive because I think sometimes it’s human nature to fixate on the bad. So maybe I was wildly enthusiastic about the book but also briefly said “Oh, but the love interest was the most boring character I’ve ever seen.” That might be the only line from the review the author notices, you know?

          I never thought about how much they must get tagged. I suppose, on one hand, they can at least be thankful for the publicity? Better than no one tagging them! :p

          Liked by 1 person

  22. I’m like you Danielle, I only manually tag the author in a tweet separately if I liked the book. I’ve heard it’s bad form to include tags and hashtags in blog titles because it’s obvious you’re just trying to save time, so the title sounds weird. Who wants to read a blog post with a bunch of hashtags in it? I certainly don’t, I think it deters readers.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yeah, I am not a fan of it. I really am not trying to judge how anyone else posts, but it looks so odd to visit a blog and the first thing I see is @##@#. I cannot bring myself to get on board. But some are saying that it is required for the tours they do. I think I am so stubborn, I would decline the tour ๐Ÿ˜‚ but that is how my brain works.

      Liked by 1 person

  23. The only thing I have ever been requested to do is hash tag the publisher, title of the book, and Netgalley/Edelweiss, or the blog tour company if the review was for a tour. I wouldn’t tag anything under four stars, and I certainly wouldn’t tag two or one star reviews. When I get copies straight from the author and they know I’m doing a blog review they will sometimes ask me to email them the link. ๐Ÿ“š

    The only time I directly @ an author is if they consider me a friend and I know they will want to RT the link to my blog post. I think it’s really weird to @ authors you don’t know well. Ha ha. ๐Ÿ˜

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Yes! I have a few authors I have corresponded with that ended up wanting to be included in reviews when they discovered I was reading the book, but I tend to limit this to pubs who send them. And a lot of time this goes in an email link instead. It depends. A few publishers I know prefer Twitter for ease of sharing, and that is ok ๐Ÿ™‚ I do not understand the who placing them directly in blog titles though really. I also include mine in a single tweet. I really do not want the publisher getting bombarded with mentions everytime someone shares my post. A few bloggers mentioned tour hosts requesting this though? I have never been asked to place hashtags directly in a title. I would be inclined to decline ๐Ÿ˜› But you know me, stubborn to a fault ๐Ÿ˜‰

      Liked by 1 person

  24. I’d like to know the answer to those questions too, so I’ll follow the comments.
    Personally, I don’t tag authors or include their twitter handles when I review a book. I strongly believe that reviews aren’t for authors to see. Reviews are for helping other readers discover something new to read.
    The most I do is include the author’s name to indicate who wrote it so the author will only see my review post if they search for their name in twitter, I guess, or on wordpress.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I have really enjoyed getting everyone’s thoughts on this! I have occasionally tagged authors and publishers in single tweets with ARCs if I know that is what they expect, but I really agree with you (not to judge how others are doing it). But reviews are for readers and that should be the target. Some authors do not even read them and I feel it should be up to them to seek them out if they want ๐Ÿ˜Š

      Liked by 1 person

  25. Great conversational post. I donโ€™t add twitter handles on my posts but I do tag them separately in a tweet if I want to share. Like you iโ€™ve Had followers adding the handle themselves for reviews Iโ€™d rather not have shared with them… so embarrassing!

    Liked by 2 people

  26. Hello Danielle! It’s been a while since I dropped by your blog ๐Ÿ˜€ anyway this is an interesting post. I’ve seen a lot of authors practically begged their followers NOT TO tag them in negative reviews and I agree because of decency. I mean, I love reading and writing negative reviews but it’s just plain rude to tag the authors… right? I only rarely tag them when it’s SUPER GLOWING reviews though. However with hashtags, I’ve never done that before even for positive reviews so it’s not something I can comment on. And it’s just rude when people share your negative reviews while tagging the authors!! Great post โค

    Liked by 1 person

  27. I think I’d only manually tag the author if it was a positive review. Unless the author’s work was unbelievably problematic and they needed to be schooled (for lack of a better word) and could stand to learn from someone’s criticisms, why do they need to see negative reviews?

    I used to review books for a book review website and one author found my negative review of her work and got incredibly defensive. It’s just one person’s opinion but writers can be sensitive. (And fans of the wtiter can be even worse.)

    I wouldn’t tag them because it saves them from getting their feelings hurt and it saves the blogger a lot of grief they don’t need.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. See I agree. I tend not to tag unless it is an ARC and I know the author and publisher expect this. And I will still not do so if it is a negative review. I review for readers anyways. And while I feel authors need to be open to criticism, they do often spend years on their work so I am not trying to slap them in the face for sure. It should be up to them to seek out reviews if they choose I think. You make some excellent points Ceri!

      Liked by 1 person

  28. I didn’t tag authors or publishers in the blog title (only the original post published on Twitter so not if someone shares from WP) but I started doing so a few weeks ago because I saw so many doing this and well I thought I kind of should then… in the beginning I thought it would be nice that an author (especially an author writing a debut) knows that their books is seen x times, but now I think I might stop this again because as you say, why do they want to read 50 times the same tweet? If they’re not going to retweet the first time, they’re not going to after 50 times either. I find it rather messy too btw ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 2 people

      1. No, you made really good points. It might not always be fun to get so many notifications. I tagged the author and publisher in my last blog post because I never get RT’s from the publisher and their authors and I was hoping it might bring my post to their attention more. Unfortunately, even this didn’t help. Aria didn’t retweet the giveaway (I did get a like though) and I believe the author didn’t either.

        Liked by 2 people

        1. For the giveaway? That seems very odd. You would think they would really want to promote that ๐Ÿ˜ž who knows really right? I think we are all constantly trying new approach and learning almost daily. You just keeping doing what feels right because your blog is wonderful! ๐Ÿ’•

          Liked by 2 people

  29. Oh gosh, I would be absolutely mortified if someone shared one of my negative reviews and tagged the author! I’m so sorry you’ve been put in such an awkward position like that before ๐Ÿ˜ฆ I actually didn’t know bloggers would include hashtags or social media handles in their post titles, so I definitely haven’t. Even now that I know it’s a “thing” I wouldn’t start: I don’t like the aesthetics of it! Not to mention, if I want an author or publishing house to see my post, then it’s my prerogative to tag them on social media or email a link. And most of my sharing happens on Twitter, where I can’t really tell how much hashtags drive traffic, versus other bloggers sharing links (I think that’s much more influential, but I don’t have any numbers to back it up!). Great discussion! โ™ฅ

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks JJ! I think you and I share very similar opinions on this topic. I also struggle with the aesthetics and would prefer to share manually on my own at my choice. I only do this with specific publishers and authors do the certain preferences they have ๐Ÿ™‚

      Like

  30. Great discussion, yet again! ๐Ÿ™‚
    I have been pondering this very same thing about @s…. I love #s though ๐Ÿ™‚
    back to @s… No, I never do @ the author in less than favourable review, I have tagged them in positive reviews and mostly I tag the author when they’re indie… for the traditionally published authors I have only tagged the publisher when I have received a review copy from them but I never add the author and my reason is simple- I am simply too freaking lazy to find the author in twitter most the times just to get their handle… aye, well…
    I think it’s one of those grey area things… but then, we all know how these grey area things can be stretched and understood differently by every single person… wish I had the answer! ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Haha I am lazy about plenty of things. So I suppose I can safely say that I do not tag enough. And I generally only tag auth and pubs I received ARCs from and know want to be tagged. Meh, there is no right or wrong I would imagine ๐Ÿ˜‰ But it is fun to pick brain and share opinions. I am a bit hung up on appearances so I will leave it all out for now.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Yeah, the tagging seems to be one of those things that is to be taken on an individual basis… I can just hear my boss’s voice in my head “Use your own discretion” hahaha… he always says that when he leaves me to handle something… And you’re right, it’s always great tp pick some brains! ๐Ÿ˜‰

        Liked by 2 people

  31. I actually have been thinking about this a lot as well… I started incorporating the twitter handles for publishers and authors in ARCs last year, mostly to help spreading the word about the books. Of course I only do this with positive reviews; I would never ever tag an author or publisher in a negative one. Thankfully I’ve never had it happen that someone else tagged the author in a negative review, because you’re right, that would have been super awkward… As a rule, if a rating is below 3,5 stars, no twitter handles will appear. I also sometimes tag an author in a non ARC review as well, especially in if it’s a 4,5 or 5 star rating and I want to send my love and thanks to the author for having read such a masterpiece. But you’re right, tagging them can be tricky and things can spin out of control on Twitter pretty fast…

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks so much for adding more insight to this Yvo! I have been curious as to what rating most reviewers deem low enough to not tag the author. I know 3 star reviews are not considered stellar, but someone assume that they are bad it seems and I disagree. But I would still be less tempted to share it with the author. I like your approach ๐Ÿ˜Š

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I agree 3 star reviews are not always bad ones… I’ve given 3 star reviews to books that were essentially good, but had a few flaws that made me lower the rating; I’ve also given lower ratings to books that weren’t for me, but other people surely would love. Still, to play it safe I would never tag the author in those. ๐Ÿ˜‰

        Liked by 2 people

  32. Brilliant discussion post, Danielle. This obviously is a super important topic as you have almost 100 comments! Wowza!

    I don’t really use Twitter. I have a Twitter account, I interact occasionally with people on it, but the format of it doesn’t mesh well with me. I struggle to find the information I find valuable or have a real conversation. I’m not ADD enough for that system to work. That said, I have occasionally used hashtags in my post header. For example, #AnneReadAlong2017. But that’s was to help keep track of it all!

    I had no idea people tagged authors in the titles of their blog posts so they could also tag them on Twitter. It makes sense. But it seems… tacky? I can understand doing it via Twitter– particularly for a well-loved book. Share your review with some kudos. But negative reviews? That’s just trolling. Rude!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I have to go against what seems to be popular opinion and agree with you that for the reason you mentioned, not a fan of them in titles on the actual post. And it also means the author is being pinged every single time the post is shared. Which seems a bit excessive. I tend to stick with a single tweet tagging whoever I need to if I choose ๐Ÿ˜‰

      Liked by 1 person

  33. I mean…I don’t think I’ve tagged any authors in my reviews yet? I think the only time I’d ever tag an author is if it was a favourite author or something? I wouldn’t tag them in a review unless the rating was 4 stars+ though simply because 3 and 3.5 stars from is still me picking out the parts I really didn’t like etc.

    I do include # in my tweets though and reviews, it’s a habit I guess, plus I don’t have time to go back and manually reply to that tweet adding the @ and # UNLESS I ran out of room in the original tweet.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I will tag and include hashtags in individual tweets if I feel I want to ๐Ÿ™‚ I am just not one for including these directly in the blog post titles. Although, I understand the idea behind it. I rarely tag authors in reviews unless I was asked to do so during correspondence. I view them as more for the readers โค

      Liked by 1 person

  34. A bit odd that anyone would intentionally add the author’s handle to a title that didn’t even have it in the first place. Either they didn’t read the review they’re sharing or they’re looking to dive into some nice ol’ drama. I don’t mind writing negative reviews, but I am most likely not going to tag the author. I don’t see why we need to go tell an author how much we hated their book and why. If there’s a common consensus about the quality of their book, they will find out rather quickly through their publishers/marketing experts/own personal research/friends/family… Nice discussion post though, in your situation, I think I’d just ignore the gesture from the fella who added the Twitter handle to the negative review. Too many reactions possible by the author to be honest hahahah

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ah yes, thank you. I think it is pretty questionable behavior on the “taggers” part for sure to share negative reviewswith authors. But I have had it done. Not fun. I feel like I was very unclear in this discussion post as that is what most seem to take from it but I was leaning more towards whether it was appropriate to include author tags directly in the blog post title so that they are tagged every single time the same past was shared good or bad. I think I missed the mark with this one and may need to rewrite it. But thanks so much. I appreciate it Lashaan!

      Liked by 1 person

  35. I actually don’t like including hashtags or Twitter handles on my blog post titles. I tend to keep the titles straight to the point. Unless the hashtag is something that is part of my reaction to the book like “This book has all the #Feels!” then I avoid them altogether.

    There is a nifty section on WP where you can edit your Social Media posts and that’s where I usually use hashtags and tag the author. I only tag the author when I write positive reviews and I think that’s the right thing to do. While I write negative reviews (even my favorite authors get negative reviews), I don’t like to tag the author out of respect. Even if my negative review is politely written.

    I also don’t have a huge following on Twitter and I’m not active on that platform so I don’t get a lot of retweets to my reviews or retweets were they tag the author so maybe that’s why I don’t have this problem?

    Like

  36. I donโ€™t tag. Iโ€™m even hesitant to tag in positive reviews. I use tags on my blog so people visiting can browse by author but when I post my review on Twitter I donโ€™t tag or even # the author. However, if theyโ€™re active on Twitter and I loved the book I might just send them a tweet telling them I loved it. So far Iโ€™ve not used Facebook for my blogs but Iโ€™d handle it the same way. No tagging of negative reviews. I feel bad enough reviewing something in a negative way.

    Liked by 1 person

  37. Hahahahahaha. Gosh. Where to start? First of all, it IS disturbing to have your slightly negative opinions shared by others. Youยดre not trying to make a point with a review. Youยดre just stating your opinion. Thereยดs a huge difference many donยดt even realize. Iยดm so so sorry someone shared your review and also tagged the author. Itยดs an awful, awkward moment when you see that happen. To facepalm is not enough. I would have contacted the person who shared the post. Lol: First line and only question would be “What the flippinยด hell possessed you to do that?” Because some special individuals realize their mistake after you point it out for them. ( this is where I would like to see physical education come back.LOL)
    Sad fact- some bloggers make it their life mission to trash authors. And if they feel they havenยดt done it enough they find other ways to drive their point home. That saddest part isnยดt because those special individuals are miserable sprouts… the saddest bit is that YOUยดre the one caught in the middle. And itยดs especially gruesome when done publicly for everyone to see. The only person getting any kind of kick out of the mess is the ass who shared & tagged. Sensationalistic pricks.
    `I still donยดt like your book, but hey… hugs.” I had to laugh after reading that line. Itยดs worth gold. Lol.

    I used to flip my top when someone shared my negative reviews on social media and tagged the author. And I took the bait in social public. Called them out on their act of cruelty. So many heated discussions that ended with me saying ” For crying out loud, find a freaking hobby. Start dancing your name or clap the alphabet. Balance a broomstick on your nose. Just do something!!” Anything I said, though, backfired. Good intentions aside… And totally forget that I was trying to defend myself, my negative reviews. It was always a losing battle. The blogger hated me. The author hated me and avoided my blog. Wonderful. Iยดve learned that the best way to handle these situations is not by filling the blog with glowing reviews ( because then Iยดd be lying.) The best way is to just let it roll off you. Ignore it. Let it happen because it will happen anyways. Anything else makes matters worse.

    Now, as for the promotional tour posts- Iยดve had enough discussions on that topic as well. I once gave an arc for a blog tour 3 stars. I was offered to do a different post for the tour because a 3 star review would taint the author. I gave a 3 star review recently for a book that had a book tour- The author thanked everyone for their 5 stars, I wasnยดt even mentioned. So much for that.

    ARCs from publishers? I will tag them if itยดs been requested, regardless of my rating. Hey, they asked for it. They need to be prepared. If they donยดt like it then I suggest they be more specific in their review & posting guidelines. What happens after that isnยดt my problem anymore because itยดs been dealt with the source directly and hasnยดt had a chance to be carried through social media by others.

    Great post! โค I might do a similar one in the future. "The idiots of the book blog universe" or something like that. Lol.

    PS- I only share great reviews ( if I manage to remember to share ). Reviews that touched me or made a positive impact. Well written reviews. ๐Ÿ™‚ โค

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I think sharing all reviews is fair game, negative or positive. I believe that they are for readers not authors, so share away. Let others who are looking for that information have easy access, but do not tag an author or publisher for the writer of the post ever ๐Ÿคฃ it should be up to me if I choose to tag an author or anyone in my work. Like you, I choose to do this only when it has been requested. But time after I time I have had it happen or see it happen haha. Thank you ๐Ÿ’œ

      Liked by 1 person

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